Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)

Initial Imposition of EU sanctions & Subsequent Amendments

Both EU and UN sanctions were in place in relation to the former Yugoslavia during the Bosnian War in the 1990s.

Following repression of and violence towards Kosovo Albanians, between 1998 and 2001, both EU and UN sanctions existed including an arms embargo, as well as targeted measures against members of the former Yugoslavian government (EU sanctions).

Whilst the UN arms embargo came to an end in October 2011, EU sanctions have continued to subsist in relation to individuals associated with the Milosevic regime.

UN Sanctions

There are no UN sanctions currently in force against the former Yugsolavia. EU sanctions are imposed pursuant to the EU’s autonomous Common Foreign and Security Policy powers.

Form of the Sanctions

Travel bans

Asset freezes

Criteria for Inclusion in Targeted Measures

Individuals targeted by the restrictive measures are the family of and those close to the leadership of Slobodan Milosevic.

Provisions in Force

Common Position 2000/696/CFSP (OJ L 287, 10 November 2000) contains: freezing of funds and travel bans

Amended by Common Position 2001/155/CFSP (OJ L 57, 26 February 2001) list of persons subject to restrictive measures

Council Regulation (EC) No 2488/2000 (OJ L 287, 10 November 2000) contains: freezing of funds

Amended by Commission Regulation (EC) No 1205/2001 (OJ L 163, 19 June 2001) list of persons subject to restrictive measures

Amended by Council Regulation (EU) No 554/2010 (OJ L 159, 24 June 2010) information on competent authorities

Amended by Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and the Council (OJ L 55, 16 February 2011) amendment of the process of consulting the Committee assigned to assist the Commission

Amended by Council Regulation (EU) No 517/2013 (OJ L 158, 13 May 2013) further information on competent authorities

Common Position 94/366/CFSP (OJ L 165, 13 June 1994) contains: prohibition to satisfy certain claims under UNSC Resolution 757

Council Regulation (EC) No 1733/1994 (OJ L 182, 11 July 1994) contains: prohibition to satisfy certain claims under UNSC Resolution 757

Case Law (all actions for annulment unless otherwise specified)

“Invest” Import und Export and Invest Commerce v Commission (Case T-189/00) – [Application for Interim Measures] (2 August 2000)

“Invest” Import und Export and Invest Commerce v Commission (Case C-317/00 P(R)) In an appeal against the Court of First Instance’s decision not to grant an interlocutory application suspending restrictive measures, the Court of Justice found that: 1) sanctions by their nature cause harm to those who in no way are responsible for the situation leading to the imposition of sanctions; 2) the importance of the aim pursued justified their negative consequences and, as such, the Regulation was not manifestly disproportionate.

 

Please Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s